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Blogs don't burn

Emily · In the words of Jason Mraz, "I'm all about the wordplay, and also Russian and East European Studies"
Oct 19 '14
Oct 18 '14
"Needless to say, Ivanishvili isn’t happy that somebody chosen by him for a top position doesn’t share his opinions. At the same time, though, untangling the knots of the past in the former Soviet space is a process that requires transparency, healthy debate, and openness. The president sighed as we spoke about the harsh criticism leveled at him by the most powerful man in his country. ‘Yes, he criticizes me,’ Margvelashvili said. ‘But it’s just a natural period of working things out that we’ve been going through.’"
The Complicated Life of Georgia’s Philosopher President. BRB, channeling Margvelashvili in all things.
Oct 17 '14

Written wisdom: On days like this

I have had a day.

I don’t want to get into specifics, because this is the Internet, but it was so full of absurdity, and disappointment, and disrespect, and quiet sadness, and each time I thought that, surely, that must be it, it wasn’t. It was a day.

But, in a way, that this was a series of unfortunate events was a good thing. Because, as of this writing, I have no more of myself to give to this day. No more energy to spend on any of the aforementioned. No more time to take care of any of it. No place in my brain to think about it, or anything other than the fact that I come from a loving, stable home, and that I have seen some quality places and met some quality people, and that I will go on to meet many more, and that I have learnt languages, and that I try to be good, and that I have cool hair, and that I’m wearing very fashion-forward trousers, and that I’m lucky to be where and what and who I am, even—or especially—on days like this.

Oct 15 '14
nevver:

Design Crush

Too real, Al.

nevver:

Design Crush

Too real, Al.

Oct 10 '14
irynka:

Motto

irynka:

Motto

(Source: decoratedskin)

Oct 6 '14

GOD DAMN GOD DAMN GOD DAMN

Oct 3 '14
Tonight, my last at home, in America, for a while, I watched Obvious Child (with my parents, which—I am not sure if you, Reader, have ever watched a movie that opens with vagina jokes and centers around an abortion, sort of, with your parents, but that is now a thing that I have done). 
In some ways, this movie, about a young woman who is still, in so many ways, such a young girl, was the wrong movie to watch in one’s childhood home, after one’s mother has cooked dinner, about to head off, again, to try to pretend to be moving further along the path to grown up-ness.
But in other ways, it was the perfect movie. Not because it is very funny and smart, although it is that. But because it’s about a young girl who is, at times despite herself, moving further along the path to grown up-ness, and getting to know herself and her parents and her friends better in the process, and learning to expect better, emotionally, for herself and others in the process, too. 
And also because now I can say that I watched a movie that opens with vagina jokes with my parents.

Tonight, my last at home, in America, for a while, I watched Obvious Child (with my parents, which—I am not sure if you, Reader, have ever watched a movie that opens with vagina jokes and centers around an abortion, sort of, with your parents, but that is now a thing that I have done). 

In some ways, this movie, about a young woman who is still, in so many ways, such a young girl, was the wrong movie to watch in one’s childhood home, after one’s mother has cooked dinner, about to head off, again, to try to pretend to be moving further along the path to grown up-ness.

But in other ways, it was the perfect movie. Not because it is very funny and smart, although it is that. But because it’s about a young girl who is, at times despite herself, moving further along the path to grown up-ness, and getting to know herself and her parents and her friends better in the process, and learning to expect better, emotionally, for herself and others in the process, too. 

And also because now I can say that I watched a movie that opens with vagina jokes with my parents.

Oct 3 '14

To Do List: Thou Shalt, Part II

I fly back to England tomorrow, and so it is time for me, full of feeling, to present the Five Commandments of my second summer (a continuation of the first.)

5. When thou feels like crying, thou shalt find the humor in the situation. Thou shalt laugh.

4. Thou shalt surround thyself with good people.

3.Thou shalt say thank you, and thou shalt mean it.
2. Thou shalt remember that things are what they are—no less, and no more.
1. Thou shalt be honest.
Oct 1 '14
I just finished The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher, Hilary Mantel’s collection of short stories. I do not know what to say to convey how much I love the way Mantel thinks, and empathizes, and how beautifully she is able to convey that thought and empathy into writing in the form of powerful prose that feels like poetry. 
And so instead I will say this: In my second year of undergrad, I briefly dated a guy who was not a reader. And we went out to lunch one day at the time that I was reading Mantel’s masterful Wolf Hall, and I showed him the book, and he said that everybody should be more of a reader like me. And while I am not sure he really meant this—we broke up a week later—he was, in a certain sense, right. Hilary Mantel’s writing, on display beautifully in The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher, haunts and deepens and breaks apart and brings back together. Everybody should be a reader of it.

I just finished The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher, Hilary Mantel’s collection of short stories. I do not know what to say to convey how much I love the way Mantel thinks, and empathizes, and how beautifully she is able to convey that thought and empathy into writing in the form of powerful prose that feels like poetry.

And so instead I will say this: In my second year of undergrad, I briefly dated a guy who was not a reader. And we went out to lunch one day at the time that I was reading Mantel’s masterful Wolf Hall, and I showed him the book, and he said that everybody should be more of a reader like me. And while I am not sure he really meant this—we broke up a week later—he was, in a certain sense, right. Hilary Mantel’s writing, on display beautifully in The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher, haunts and deepens and breaks apart and brings back together. Everybody should be a reader of it.

Oct 1 '14
"I notice how easily, in most cases, committees agree the minutes, but when we are singular and living our separate lives we dispute—don’t we?—each second we believe we won. It’s not generally agreed, it’s not much appreciated, that people are divided by all sorts of things, and that, frankly, death is the least of them. When lights are blossoming out across the boulevards and parks, and the town assumes its Victorian sagesse, I shall be moving on again. I see that both the living and the dead commute, riding their familiar trains. I am not, as you will have gathered, a person who needs false excitement, or simulated innovation. I am willing, though, to tear up the timetable and take some new routes; and I know I shall find, at some unlikely terminus, a hand that is meant to rest in mind."
Hilary Mantel, “Terminus”